Github Streak - 200 Days

I just hit a milestone. Today’s the 200th day of my continuous coding. It means I have coded for last 200 days, without letting a day skip by.

Here’s the screenshot of my Github streak.

streak

Now, before you jump over my Github profile to verify the graph, let me tell you that most of the code is in the private repositories for Owlgrin.

Here are a few experiences I had along the way.

The Dip

When you chase a milestone that takes time and consistency to achieve, you often feel like giving up somewhere in the middle. Seth Godin has made the concept of The Dip popular, which is, “a temporary setback that can be overcome with persistence”.

I felt the dip when I completed 100 days. I didn’t feel like continuing the streak as it takes quite a good amount of mind-peace (specially on weekends). I felt like giving up mostly because of the timezone difference that Github has. According to Github’s timezone, their new day began at 1.30PM IST.

Seth often says this about the dip: “we often give up going to gym when it is about to become a habit”.

I didn’t give up then.

And in another week, the thing became a habit. Now, I don’t have to think about it. It just happens naturally.

Lack of Ideas

If you are a developer, you will understand that we are not creative for all 365 days of the year. Obviously, we feel the need of taking rest and recharge our creativity-batteries.

Sometimes in the journey, even I felt the lack of ideas. For those days, I did something really simple, like cleaning up the code, refactoring a few things and that's all.

Fortunately, I had a lot of things to work upon, like Gaurilla’s backend, frontend, landing page, user guides, Cashew. Whenever I felt exhausted with one thing, I switched to another for the day.

Cheating

Yes, I cheated a few times too. (Oops!)

Twice, I happened to be totally exhausted of energy and for those days, I just commented out the code for complex business logic of the Gaurilla.

Around 10th March 2014, Github changed their streak to be timezone-aware, which means from then onwards, they would count the commits in my timezone. But that came as a surprise to me. I noticed it when my streak broke at 185 days.

I checked all my commits and found them to be fine according to their timezone. But then a quick Google search gave me the answer.

Because my streak was broken due to the change in the platform, I made a commit in the past by changing my machine’s time.


These were some exciting moments in my journey of 200 days of coding. I definitely look forward to make it 365. And once that happen, I want to do it for open-source projects. I have gained so much from the open source community that I will pump up my efforts more to give back to the community.

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